Posts Tagged ‘ Wii ’

Let’s Play Game Expo 2017

Let’s Play Game Expo (LPGE) started 3 years ago and was held at the Plano Convention Center the first two years. I first became aware of the convention through flyers at one of the stores that helped get the convention started: FX Game Exchange. In only three years, the relatively small convention has rapidly outgrown its inaugural location in Plano. From the start, the arcade set up has been above and beyond what I’d expect at a small convention and this year was no different. There’s also a free play console area in addition to the free arcades.

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Just about 1/3 of the arcades set to free play at the convention for the weekend.

The vendor count has only grown with over 85 vendors at this year’s convention according to the website.

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Likewise, this is maybe 1/3 of the vendor area.

The other big draw has been the tournament scene held each year. This year’s tournaments included Low Tier City 5’s national Smash Bros. Tournament, The Ultimate Q*Bert Hi-Score Tournament (with special guest Warren Davis, creator of the arcade game itself), an Oregon Trail tournament, Quake III, and even a Virtual Boy tournament among many others. The Nintendo Playstation was also on hand for viewing.

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Tournaments are shown on a main stage.

Normally, the convention has been in June, but with the move to the new, larger, venue along with tournament scheduling, it was scheduled for the first weekend in August. The problem, at least for me, with this was the short time between LPGE and Retropalooza in October. Not as much time to recover spending money as a June to October stretch.

I had sold some finds, put money back, and had games to trade, hoping to knock out the last 15 or so N64 games still on my hunting list for around $200 to $250, then knock out a chunk of Atari 2600 or GameCube titles on my list. In total, I was taking $825 cash along with $3,000 worth of games to trade. I was more than ready to work a deal to knock those games off my list, taking the losing end of a trade in order to get closer to completing my primary collection goal.

Day 1 of LPGE

My friend Phil, @TerranceHarken, met me at the expo at opening. He and I both paid $8.50 online in advance for convention parking, only to find it was $8 at the parking garage. On top of that, there was no in & out privilege for parking. A bit frustrating as parking was free at Plano’s location.

Nostalgic Nerds

All the same, we headed into the convention to start the big hunt. Our first stop was to visit a buddy of mine that makes up one half of The Nostalgic Nerd. Looking over what they had, nothing jumped out immediately… except Chip n’ Dale Rescue Rangers 2. For $240.

Let me take a moment to promote these guys just a bit. What Patrick and Matt do with Nostalgic Nerd tends to beat most other vendors at conventions. They price based on Pricecharting and add tax on the sticker, so what you see is what you pay. Rescue Rangers 2 is at $225 on Pricecharting and they had it at $240, but other vendors were anywhere from $250 to $300 for this gem. Overall, their prices were better than other vendors. They also are eager to trade, offering 75-80% of Pricecharting values in trade or 50% in cash. But I wasn’t here to buy an expensive NES game!

First Purchase

Moving on from Nostalgic Nerd, I had to start looking around. We started meandering along the rows of vendors. Phil found a place that had Final Fantasy V for Game Boy Advance complete in box for a reasonable price and was going to buy it, but I hopped in and asked about Superman on NES and got it bundled in for $5 off the total of the two. Comic book based games are a sub-list I’ve been collecting for, so I was happy to grab that one.

“I love the Power Glove. It’s so….bad.”

The first thing that I came across that really interested me was the Power Glove, with hook ups. The Power Glove is one of those items that I don’t need, but think is cool to have. However, they wanted $100 for it and I was definitely not paying that. Moving down a few tables, we found another one for $60, also with everything but the box and any paperwork. I considered it briefly, but wanted to wait before dropping a large chunk of money. When I hesitated, the guy dropped it to $40, which seemed like a good enough deal to me, so I walked away with a Power Glove of my very own.

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The Power Glove gives me John Cena level invisibility

An Unexpected Find

Continuing to venture through the vendor area, I came across a copy of Valkyrie Profile for Playstation. I asked mainly out of curiosity and the guy wanted $120, but right off said he’d do $100 on it, which he was pretty sure was the disc only price on Pricecharting. That seemed fair, but I wasn’t planning on buying pricey Playstation games at this convention. Still, I had to look it up and see and the current price was showing $85 for disc only, so he agreed to do $90 if it was cash. So, once again, I decided it was a fair deal to knock out one of the last 3 notably expensive Playstation games on my list, and an RPG at that. I was quickly going down the spending hole and I had barely been here an hour. (Side note: Funny enough, I am in a Facebook group with the guy and neither of us realized it at the time).

A Few Good Pick Ups

We also came across a copy of Star Fox complete in box for $35 at a vendor that had a few other games well below Pricecharting values. However, they had some issues, so I passed on the others (minor cosmetic issues here and there mostly), but I decided to take the Star Fox so I could upgrade my box at home. I also found an Atari 2600 cartridge of Snoopy and the Red Baron, which I’ve been looking for a good while now for $5 off regular price.

I found a booth that had Ocarina of Time Collector’s Edition, Dr. Mario 64, and a guy sharing the booth that had Tactics Ogre 64: Person of Lordly Caliber. Prices were fair, but I was really hoping to find ALL my N64 targets in one location and work a killer deal in a large bundle. Still, I kept thinking about those for a while.

We made a few more final loops and Phil picked up some extra games before he had to head out around midday due to work.

Going Solo

After he left, I kept looking around vendors, seeing if I had missed anything and what I wanted to make mental notes for a return trip on Sunday rather than pay sticker price. A lot of vendors do deals before closing up the last day to avoid packing and hauling things back home.

I decided I hadn’t seen Ocarina of Time anywhere else, so I went back and got Dr. Mario 64 and OoT together. I didn’t get a great deal for the two, the guy taking $3 off, which brought them down to Pricecharting prices, but it was something.

On my way out, a guy had N64 games they were still trying to get out. Tubs of them. We went through and found a few more on my list: Castlevania Legacy of Darkness, 007 The World Is Not Enough, and Wipeout 64. I went back to the Ocarina of Time booth and tried to get Tactics Ogre for $35, then $40 but the guy was staying firm at $45.

So, having had no luck with anyone willing to take anything I brought for trades, I went back to Nostalgic Nerd and let them pilfer my list for what they’d want. In the end, they cleaned out a good portion of my complete Sega Genesis games, a number of NES carts, some N64, and Wii titles. I left the first day with one final game I never really thought I’d pick up: Chip n’ Dale Rescue Rangers 2.

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I honestly never thought I’d actually pick this up.

Overall, the first day was pretty good.

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Day 1 results

Day 2 of LPGE

I returned the second day and had a good start to the day saving that 50 cents by paying at the garage rather than online and got a great parking spot. It’s important to appreciate small victories.

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Pretty close to the elevators, I’d say.

No Returns or Exchanges…sorta!

I started off by going back to the guy I had bought Ocarina and Dr. Mario 64 from after I had realized the night before I already had Dr. Mario! Despite keeping a list, it seems I had forgotten to remove it from my hunting list. I was asking for a straight value trade and I’d put the balance of cash towards his price on Battletoads in Battlemaniacs, but he wanted an extra $3 on it. I told him I’d think on it, but was rubbed a little wrong by the idea. He recognized me, he remembered the purchase, he knew I had bought from him the day before, but wasn’t willing to make the trade on value for the mistake. Instead, he wanted to recoup the $3 he had knocked off (which was $3 over Pricecharting to begin with). I was fairly sure I wasn’t going to take the deal, but wasn’t going to completely write it off.

A Really Good Trade In

One thing I had seen the day before was a copy of Thousand Arms for Playstation at a booth that was asking $125 for the game with manual and case. I had a copy of the game without the manual and research had revealed it had originally included a holographic card as well as memory card stickers. The game, case, and manual was regularly $50 on eBay, but I had asked them what the trade value would be on mine without the manual. They had told me $90, but I hadn’t made a trade. The more I thought on it, however, the more it seemed like a good deal considering I had only paid $20 for my copy. As such, they were my next stop for the second day.

Going back, they were still good with a $90 trade credit on my copy without the manual, so I handed it right over and bought a complete copy with manual, case, game discs, along with sticker sheet, a second sticker sheet (missing 1 sticker), and 2 of the holographic cards on eBay for $85. I then picked up Shiren the Wanderer for Nintendo Wii, Radiata Stories, and Banjo Tooie for a friend.

Patience Wins Out

I didn’t find much else and spent most of the day looking around and chatting with vendors, though I did get Dig Dug with a very nice label for $3.  I then went back and got Tactics Ogre 64 for $40 (let a game sit on the table for two days and people are more ready to make a sale!). Next to them, I picked up Shadow Hearts From the New World for $20.

Finally, I was getting ready to wrap up the day and went back by Nostalgic Nerd. I had been considering some Sega Genesis games they had, including Phantasy Star I and II and had brought some more NES games for trade.

Instead, I wound up taking Sonic Adventure 2. I had spent enough cash, I was starting to get tighter on the wallet and wanted to keep to trades. However, Matt just had to tell me of a booth he was sure was cutting good deals during the weekend and with the day winding down, I had to check them out.

Final Deals

Sure enough, they had reasonable prices and I was debating a bundle of games, but really wanted a Star Wars game for Atari 2600 I had seen. I had them put the bundle aside so I could see how the Star Wars panned out. After getting it, Star Wars: The Arcade Game, for $20, I headed back but saw Superman on Atari 2600…and snagged it for one whole dollar!

I returned and scrapped a game from the pile, but still got Golden Axe II for Genesis, Phantasy Star Online Ver 2.0, and Evolution the World of Sacred Device for Dreamcast. However, when I come back to make that deal I find Matt and Patrick of Nostalgic Nerd going through the guy’s stuff to make some deals for themselves! I couldn’t help but swing by their booth and grab a pic.

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“Gone deal hunting, back later.” – Those nerd boys are at it again!

The weekend was winding down to a close and I still had half my money left. I went back to my car and locked everything in the trunk before going back to browse this year’s free play arcade.

All in all, I felt like I took home a pretty big haul of some high value games, which tends to be the real benefit of conventions these days. If you’re still looking for more common and lower price titles, eBay and game stores are still a pretty good source, but for the real valuable games, conventions tend to have a lot of them.

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Day 2 results

I don’t feel like trades are as strong at conventions as they used to be, though. Unless you have rare and higher value things, people just aren’t interested in doing trades, with a few exceptions. Some stores want to boost inventory of common games and anything Nintendo first party is likely to be a consideration. I just didn’t have much luck with anyone even wanting those this time.  As always, cash is king, even if people are taking credit cards at conventions more often now.

So here are my main pieces of advice for conventions:

  1. Look for your rarer and hard to find items on your list.
  2. Walk around to every booth before buying things. Look for price differences and buy the best value for your buck.
  3. Try to look for multiple things you want at a single booth and bundle up. You’ll usually get better deals that way.
  4. Practice your negotiating skills at garage sales and flea markets. They’ll help at conventions too!

Now there’s 2 months left until Retropalooza, so it’s time to get out and hunt, find some deals, and do some trades and flips to build up cash for the next round of convention hunting!

Fox (Game)Hunts 7-22-17

Author’s Note: I’m trying a particular method for writing these game hunting “hunter’s journal” entries. The format and writing style will likely change as I decide what I like best, and what readers seem to like best.

6:40 AM

I had found a Craigslist post for a garage sale that had video games the night before. An e-mail to the poster had confirmed the games were for PSP and PS2. As the correspondence had come back late in the evening, I had elected to retire for the evening rather than answer the query as to any titles I was in search of. My PS2 list is still rather long, so I expected I would simply see what was there on the morrow.

Upon waking, I looked to the clock and had the dreadful realization that I had over-slept. Not by much, but mere moments can prove all the difference when hunting elusive video games. I quickly put the dog out and brushed my teeth before throwing on clothes. I called for the dog to come in, but she ignored me. Going out, she was around the house and upon seeing me, excitedly followed back inside. Another minute lost.

In the car, I drove as fast as I dare go, wary of surpassing posted limits, but making all haste possible. The address of the garage sale wasn’t far, but time was ticking and each red light taunted me. Upon reaching the proper street, a sign posted at the end indicated I had entered a digit wrong in GPS. I hurried to the sign’s address to find no games. Returning to the initial address, I now spotted the location of the morning hunt! The sale was to start at 7 AM and I was still a bit early at 6:55 AM. Hurrying up the drive, I learned the games were purchased in full approximately 10 minutes prior, leaving only Scrabble for Playstation behind. The seller, a kind gentleman I placed possibly in his 40s at most, shared that the games had actually included Playstation 1 titles when he listed Final Fantasy Tactics and Xenogears as examples of what he had.

Not wanting to inflict further disappointment, I did not ask what he had charged. In hindsight, despite the late hour, I should have replied to the e-mail and perhaps even offered to buy them the night before, but alas, I did not and could only move forward.

With Let’s Play Game Expo two weeks away, I had not planned to go garage sale hunting, but out and with the bitter taste of lost games in my mouth, I decided to do a little bit. Finding a post with a CIB (Complete in Box) PS2 in the photo, I headed for another sale. I worried I was again a step behind. After all, another hunter was in the area, so I assumed they would already be on the trail of this one as well.

7:15 AM

I arrived at the house to find no sale. Checking the listing again, I realize it started at 8 and there I sat pondering the best course of action. Ultimately, I decided to wait, hoping for an early start. Not long after, the garage door opened and a short, Asian woman pulled the care out to park in the drive way. I opened my door and half stepped out, asking her if the sale was still scheduled to start at 8. She confirmed the start time and apologized. About 15 to 20 minutes later, she came out again, as well as her husband, who came towards my car.

I got out and he said they had some things to set up, but would start now and I could come look. As I walked up, I told him what I was interested in and they had it sitting on a shelf in the garage. He said something to his wife before going inside, which I thought sounded like he was speaking Japanese. Upon looking at the games, I realize they were all Japanese releases! There was a GunCon 2, which was black rather than the bright orange of the US release. They were asking $50 for the CIB PS2 and games as well as $50 for the CIB Wii and games. A fair price on both, but I only had $100 in my pocket and a game convention in 2 weeks, so I passed.

7:25 AM

I was considering giving up for the morning, but there was another sale just around the corner from the last, so I stopped to check. As I walked up, I spotted a few Wii games along with Call of Duty on PS3 and PS4. They asked $2 each on the Wii games and $5 each on the Playstation titles. I knew Mario Party 8 was worth about $20 and New Super Mario Bros. Wii was worth about $10, so I took them. I had to check values, but went ahead and picked up Michael Jackson The Experience, Brave, and Wii Sports. I tend to always pick up Wii Sports as it sales on eBay for $10 in the cardboard sleeve. This was a Nintendo Selects copy in a plastic case. He agreed to $8 as that was all I had without breaking a bill.

Upon returning to my car, I realized I had not checked to ensure the discs were present and immediately proceeded to do so. Mario Party 8 had no disc, but it was in Michael Jackson’s case. Brave had Michael Jackson. Wii Sports had Wii Sports. I went back and showed them, thinking I would swap the game for Disney Princess My Fairytale Adventure if they didn’t have the disc. Ironically, I should have picked it up first as it’s worth more than Brave.

The man’s wife told him it might be in the Wii, which was in a box right there by the front door. He plugged it in and pressed the button and sure enough, we found Brave. He said the system wasn’t working anymore and I asked what he planned to do with it. He was planning on seeing what a store would give for it, thinking they could fix it. Since I’ve been getting into the repair hobby on consoles, I was interested. For another $10, I got the Wii system with 2 controllers, 2 nunchuks, all hook ups, and the Disney Princess game thrown in.

7:40 AM

Feeling much better about the day’s outing, I had one more stop I wanted to go to, though it was a good 30 minute drive away and would not open until 10 AM. I decided to backtrack and stop at all the signs for garage sales I had passed. The first one I stopped at had a pair of Guitar Hero guitars with their boxes for Nintendo Wii. Normally I’m not interested in the instruments, but it made me ask if there were games and the older gentleman who was busy with numerous people at this sale said there were! Only, he wasn’t sure where they were.

We began searching, looking around different boxes as his wife was asked where they were. I was about to give up and leave him my contact information when his wife found them. Nothing incredible, but 007 Nightfire on GameCube and NBA2K13 for Wii made it worth the $1-$2 each they were asking. I went ahead and took the guitars for $1 each as well. They also had the manual for Pokemon Red & Blue, which was included at no cost.

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9 AM

I continued to stop at any signs I saw on the way, but mostly came up lacking. A Nintendo DS Lite for $2 was my only find before heading for a small resale shop’s closing sale.

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Looks like poor Kirby’s gotten beat up.

10 AM

Once I arrived at the shop, I saw they had Wii accessories and Disney Infinity figures priced rather high to be considered a real deal, but not completely unreasonable either. I kept looking. In the back with a box of casette tapes, I found a pair of N64 games. Sports titles, but $2 each. To finalize the hunt, I picked up a Tiger Handheld Baseball game for $1 to go with them.

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Pulling out of the shop and heading home, I stopped at a final garage sale, but had no luck. Satisfied with the morning results, I headed home to prepare for the evening’s activities: a Facebook group’s game meet up.

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Game Spent Estimated Value
Mario Party 8 $2 $20
New Super Mario Bros Wii $2 $10
Michael Jackson The Experience $2 $10
Wii Sports $2 $10
Brave $0 $10
Disney Princess My Fairytale Adventure $0 $18
Wii System with controllers and hook ups $10 $50
NBA2K13 $1 $15
Ultimate I Spy $1 $4
Game Party 3 $1 $5
007 Nightfire $2 $9
Guitar Hero III $1 $5
Guitar Hero III guitars in box $2 $10
Nintendo DS Lite $2 $20
Track and Field 2000 $2 $11
NBA Showtime NBA on NBC $2 $5
Tiger Handheld Baseball $1 $10
TOTAL $33 $232 Estimated

Facebook Game Group Meetup

5:30 PM

I spent the midday getting all the extra games I have together for a Facebook group meetup. I didn’t think I had anything truly worthwhile at this point, but it was worth taking. My goal was to sell and trade without spending any money.

Upon arriving, I looked around at what people had out. A decent spread of NES and SNES, Wii, PS2, and Playstation games, but little N64, which are what I’m particularly hunting right now. I did meet someone I knew to trade Phantasy Star Online on Dreamcast for Fighting Vipers on Sega Saturn. I also had my first sighting of live chodes in the wild as both Billy and Jay from The Game Chasers showed up.

Finding some small space to utilize, I brought my boxes in and set them up for people to look through. A few found things they were curious about, but no purchases or trades. Once things started to clear out a bit, I moved to a table with more room. Still not much overall, but I sold a few Atari games, Rampage Total Destruction on GameCube, and Bottom of the 9th on N64 for around $22 total.

I had left my higher value items in the trunk, but kept eyeing the table next to me where a guy had Earthbound and Suikoden II. After offering to trade the Tiger Handheld Baseball for Suikoden II was declined (though it was clear it was a struggle for the guy, I assure you!), I knew I’d have to trade some big titles. I loaded up what I had out and brought in the good stock.

He was willing to trade Suikoden II for Dokapon Kingdom CIB on Wii, Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker CIB on GameCube, and Super Smash Bros. Melee without a manual on GameCube. I was hesitant to make the trade. These were quality trade bait for Let’s Play Game Expo and had a value of about $165 vs Suikoden II’s $140 average. I started to back out to wait for the convention.

Taking another look, I examined the Suikoden II’s case, manual, and disc. They were in immaculate condition. Despite the value disparity, I decided two common GameCube games I paid $7 for was worth adding to the Dokapon Kingdom trade. We shook hands and I knocked off one of the hard to find, and second most expensive, game on my Playstation hunting list.

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As I left, I noticed Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II for NES in a very nice box. The guy wanted $30, but would take the game out and do $20 for the pristine box and manual. I went ahead and spent the $20 I had made selling the earlier games.

All in all, not a bad day.

Game Spent Value
Suikoden II $97 spent on games traded for Suikoden II $140
TMNT II Box & Manual $7 spent on games sold, then cash spent for the box & manual $30

On to Let’s Play Game Expo!

 

Going Retro: Getting into Game Collecting

Disclaimer: The top image is not my game collection….yet!

I went to GameStop a few years back (I don’t have nearly as much of a problem with them as some) and saw a friend of mine who was the store manager at the time. Before I left, she recommended I read Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. Her recommendation was so high that I wound up going to Barnes & Noble the same time to pick it up. I read the full book in a flight to Seattle and back.

I loved the book, but it also kindled a fire in me for nostalgia of my own childhood, primarily for video games. I started thinking about my backlog of games on current consoles and, like many gamers, wondered if I’d ever get through them all. Then the idea hit me: If I couldn’t play through all the games, why not start collecting them and curating a library of of the best ones?

I started by going to garage sales and looking for older games. One of the first I went to I met a guy who was also collecting and working towards a complete North American licensed release NES library. He invited me to join a Facebook group and I began to realize how many people were into retro game collecting. I decided I need t obetter define what games I wanted to start building my own library.

What Games To Get?

I started by thinking about consoles. I still had my NES, SNES, N64, GameCube, Genesis, and PS3 at this point. I decided I would try to get all the consoles I had played growing up and a “Top 100” library of the best games on each system. Then I’d also include memorable games I enjoyed as a child if they weren’t on the “Top 100” list. This meant acquiring an Atari 2600, Sega Saturn & Dreamcast, a Playstation and PS2. I didn’t include hand held systems as they have never been a big interest for me.

To determine a “best of” hunting list for each system, I started with sites like IGN and GameSpot that had done “Top 100” articles before. Next, I went to fogurms where posters had debated their picks for the best games with discussion and votes moving games up/down the list and adding/dropping off the list. I took the titles that appeared across each list and made that my Hunting List.

For example:
IGN Top 100 NES Games
Retro Sanctuary Top 100 Best NES Games
Game FAQs Top 100 NES Games

All in all, I actually came up with a list of:

  • 106 Atari 2600
  • 164 NES
  • 147 SNES
  • 101 Sega Genesis
  • 88 N64
  • 95 Sega Dreamcast
  • 83 GameCube
  • 215 PS2
  • 220 PS3

Obviously the “Top 100” grew with the additional titles I remembered and moreso as I decided to include infamously bad titles and all RPGs.

Benefits of the List, and How to Use It

I highly recommend creating a list to work from, even if you are going for a complete library of every title on a system. Put the list in Google Drive and get the app on your phone. I use a spreadsheet listing the titles and their Pricecharting value across 6 rows to minimize scrolling, divided up by systems. This way your list is always on hand and you can make sure you don’t buy a duplicate of something you’ve already picked up (so long as you update and save the file in Google Drive, of course).

I did mention I keep the price for each game from Pricecharting on my list. I’ve seen in some groups there are people who think Pricecharting is crap and should never be used. I’ve yet to understand why some think this. Pricecharting basically tracks prices of completed auctions from eBay to give an average price. Using completed auctions ensures you’re getting information based on what people are actually willing to pay. I don’t advise taking it as the absolute price, though. You can look at the auctions the data is coming from to make sure they’re recent. If not, you can go to ebay directly and see what recent prices were on sold listings. Sometimes Pricecharting doesn’t have recent data on their averages, but I find this an uncommon occurrence.

One thing to remember is these are largely eBay based prices, so I think it’s safe to push for a bit less than those prices since a seller would lose 10% to eBay fees, not to mention the hassle of shipping.

Where To Hunt for Games?

The simple answer is: everywhere.

Garage Sales / Flea Markets / Thrift Stores / Antique Stores
Obviously these are all hit or miss, but you never know what you might find. I always keep an eye out for other items completely unrelated to video games that I can flip for profit to further pay for game collecting such as vintage posters, Disney or Warner Bros. items, or anything that I think might be worth reasonably more than is being asked.

GameStop
If you’re looking for XBox 360, Playstation 3, Wii, or Wii U games, it’s worth looking into GameStop prices. There are some titles I’ve gotten much cheaper at GameStop than Pricecharting shows, meaning you’re actually better off with GameStop, especially if you have their Power Up Reward card. A few examples as of the time of this writing:

Sakura Wars on Wii is worth $25, but $13.50 with discount at GameStop
Arc Rise Fantasia on Wii is worth $34, but $27 with discount at GameStop
Ar tonelico Qoga: Kneel of Ar Ciel on PS3 is worth $22.50, but $9 with discount at GameStop

If you’re really lucky and can find a copy of Dokapon Kingdom at GameStop, it will run you $45 rather than $80 for just the disc.

It’s just a matter of researching the titles you’re looking for and checking if they have them near you, then going or calling to verify if they’re complete with manual. If you hunt during a Buy 2 Get 1 Free weekend, you can really clean up.

Half Price Books
People in a lot of gaming groups hate Half Price Books, primarily because they overprice games. I’ve found some stores do, some don’t, and some are reasonably in line with Pricecharting prices. I find it’s worth looking at least and I tend to drive around to as many as I can on the coupon weeks for 20-50% off coupon purchases. That’s how I got Skies of Arcadia on GameCube for $35 and Mario Cement Factory for $50.

Game Stores
The chain stores, such as Game X-Change, are unlikely to offer real deals unless you catch them slipping on values. Sometimes you’ll find fair prices on titles you’ve been looking for but haven’t had luck finding. Game X-Change also offers a B2G1 deal on all games $7.95 or less. This doesn’t help as you get to a point where you’re hunting more expensive titles, of course.

Your best bet is small independent stores where the owner is more likely to be willing to work a deal with you if you buy multiple games at a time and return with repeat business.

eBay
Of course, this is sort of a last resort, but if you’re patient and watch close, you’ll sometimes catch good deals on games you’ve been looking for with no luck for a long while.

Facebook Groups
You’ll find Facebook groups where people buy, sell, and trade their extra games. I recommend taking some time to get a feel for how the group is and if you want to work with them for trades.

Gaming Conventions
If you want to get a good deal at conventions, you probably want to work on your haggling skills and still go in with good games to trade and cash to spend. The last few conventions I’ve been to weren’t too great for deals, but were full of rare things you won’t find at the average store. You might use conventions to target rare and hard to find additions for your collection.